Posted in Chronic Pain, Grief, Palliative Care, Terminal Illness, Uncategorized, Vicky Bruce

Pain keeps you alive!


Vic has been accepted into the Hospice program.  The doctor evaluated her at 07h00 this morning and immediately gave her a strong pain-injection.  She also put on a 75mg Durogesic patch.  Vic will remain at home.  We now have access to nursing professionals 24/7.  A subcutaneous infusion will be set up this afternoon for the administration of all further pain medication .  Vic will no longer drink any tablets.

Vic has a partial obstruction and an abscess in the abdomen.

The continuous subcutaneous infusion of drugs by a small portable pump (sometimes called a “syringe driver”) is a major advance in terminal care, particularly for symptom control in the home. It has a number of advantages over intravenous therapy. It is safer (much less risk of infection and no risk of air embolus). The patient can remain fully ambulant. Tolerance does not develop to subcutaneous morphine as it does occasionally to IV morphine. (see Morphine)

The main indications for continuous subcutaneous infusions are vomiting, dysphagia, severe weakness or unconsciousness. They can be particularly useful for patients at home, either to control nausea and vomiting, or during the last days of life if the patient is no longer managing oral medication.

A continuous subcutaneous infusion of drugs is particularly useful in the management of malignant intestinal obstruction. (see Intestinal Obstruction)       http://www.hospiceworld.org/book/subcutaneous-infusions.htm

In the words of Dr Sue Walter, MBBCH/PALLIATIVE MEDICINE, “Vic’s suffering is inhumane”.

She explained to us that Vic’s pain is what is keeping her alive.  “An adrenaline rush is the fight or flight response of the adrenal gland, in which it releases adrenaline (epinephrine). When releasing adrenaline, one’s body releases dopamine which can act as a natural pain killer. An adrenaline rush causes the muscles to perform respiration at an increased rate improving strength. It also works with the nervous system to interpret impulses that trigger selective glands.”  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrenaline_Rush

Maybe this is the final part of Vic’s journey.  I do however expect her to bounce back!

Syringe driver

 

 

Author:

I am a sixty something wife,mother, sister, grandmother and friend. I started blogging as a coping mechanism during my beautiful daughter's final journey. Vic was desperately ill for 10 years after a botched back operation. Vic's Journey ended on 18 January 2013 at 10:35. She was the most courageous person in the world and has inspired thousands of people all over the world. Vic's two boys are monuments of her existence. She was an amazing mother, daughter, sister and friend. I will miss you today, tomorrow and forever my Angle Child. https://tersiaburger.wordpress.com

8 thoughts on “Pain keeps you alive!

  1. Hallo Tersia, so glad that she was accepted. I can only imagine that sharing the load with the hospice – even if it is only for moral support, must mean the world to all of you. Thanks for sharing your journey with us. Hugs

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    1. Hi Renee. The greatest thing has been the pain relief. The vomiting is much better, her ulcer will have time to heal, constipation is better and the pain has been reduced by at least 50%! We are so grateful!

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    1. Brave Katie I am honored – thank you! You better than most understands the inhumanity of pain. I truly think of you every single day of my life. I am always wondering how you are doing. You have opened my eyes to the “world of pain”. Thank you for your wonderful blog and the honesty of your posts.

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