The Liver….


 The liver works with the endocrine system to regulate nutrients in the body and remove toxins. An enlarged liver means that it is endangered due to disease or other factors, which can lead to toxic shock. The proper medical term for an enlarged liver is hepatomegaly.

A healthy liver helps fight infections and filters toxins from the blood. It also helps to digest food, store nutrients for future needs, manufactures protein, bile and blood-clotting factors and metabolizes medications. A healthy liver has the ability to grow back, or regenerate, when it is damaged. Anything that prevents the liver from performing these functions – or from growing back after injury – can severely impact health and very possibly length of life.

What Are the Symptoms of Liver Failure?

The initial symptoms of liver failure are often ones that can be due to any number or conditions. Because of this, liver failure may be initially difficult to diagnose. Early symptoms include:

  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Diarrhea

However, as liver failure progresses, the symptoms become more serious, requiring urgent care. These symptoms include:

  • Jaundice
  • Bleeding easily
  • Swollen abdomen
  • Mental disorientation or confusion (known as hepatic encephalopathy)
  • Sleepiness
  • Coma

http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/digestive-diseases-liver-failure

Causes

Fatty or enlarged livers are caused by infections, certain medications, general toxicity, hepatitis, autoimmune disorders, metabolic syndrome and genetic disorders that affect the liver. Abnormal growths, such as cysts or tumors, impact liver size. Blood-flow symptoms, such as heart failure, can cause liver enlargement. Conditions also exist that restrict blood to the liver veins, such as hepatic vein thrombosis.

An enlarged liver indicates a problem with the liver itself or your overall endocrine system. If you suspect that you have any of these symptoms, you should seek medical attention. The causes of an enlarged liver vary in their severity and complexity. Only a medical professional can make the proper diagnosis for the cause of an enlarged liver.

Read more: http://www.webdiagnosis.com/causes-of-an-enlarged-liver#ixzz2CzDrLFH2

If not addressed and stopped in the earlier stages, the damage resulting from these multiple causes leads to scarring of the liver, known as cirrhosis, where large portions of the organ begin to lose their capacity to function or regenerate.

Treatment of patients with liver failure is specific to the unique symptoms and conditions experienced by each individual. Any patient with liver damage will be asked to abstain from alcohol. For patients with cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease, medications may be required to control the amount of protein absorbed in the diet. If there has been a build-up of toxins, particularly high ammonia levels, medication will be offered which lowers these levels. Low sodium diet and water pills (diuretics) may be required to minimize water retention. In those with large amounts of ascites fluid, the excess fluid may have to be occasionally removed with a needle and syringe (paracentesis). Using local anesthetic, a needle is inserted through the abdominal wall and the fluid withdrawn. Sometimes surgery is performed to minimize portal hypertension and lower the risk of gastroesophageal bleeding.

At this point, a person may become a candidate for liver transplant of part or all of the liver. Transplant success has improved in recent years with 1-year patient survival rates of up to 87%.  Due to the severe organ shortages, patients who are listed for liver transplantation have an estimated wait time of 1 to 3 years, depending on blood type and illness severity. Many patients are never able to be considered for transplants due to severity of their disease, other medical problems, or social considerations such as ongoing alcohol use or non-compliance with treatment recommendations. Others die while waiting for a transplant as their disease continues to progress.

The impact of these various symptoms and conditions on suffering and quality of life are profound, and ESLD patients can benefit greatly from hospice and palliative care. Even, when an ESLD patient is on a transplant list, this does not automatically prevent them from being on hospice services.

According to Medicare/Hospice  guidelines, patients will be considered to be in the terminal stage of liver disease (life expectancy of six months or less) and eligible for hospice care, if they meet the following criteria (1 and 2 must be present; factors from 3 will lend supporting documentation):

1. The patient should show both a and b:
a. Prothrombin time prolonged more than 5 seconds over control, or International Normalized Ratio (INR)> 1.5
b. Serum albumin <2.5 gm/d1

2. End stage liver disease is present and the patient shows at least one of the following:
a. ascites, refractory to treatment or patient non-compliant
b. spontaneous bacterial peritonitis
c. hepatorenal syndrome (elevated creatinine and BUN with oliguria (<400ml/day) and urine sodium concentration <10 mEq/l)
d. hepatic encephalopathy, refractory to treatment, or patient non-complaint
e. recurrent variceal bleeding, despite intensive therapy

3. Documentation of the following factors will support eligibility for hospice care:
a. progressive malnutrition
b. muscle wasting with reduced strength and endurance
c. continued active alcoholism (> 80 gm ethanol/day)
d. hepatocellular carcinoma
e. HBsAg (Hepatitis B) positivity
f. hepatitis C refractory to interferon treatment

http://www.hospiceofthecomforter.org/en/post/medical-perspective/understanding-endstage-liver-disease

 

4 thoughts on “The Liver….

  1. You know Anthony was diagnosed with liver disease several years ago but for some reason the PD took precedence. Now that I’ve read this I realize that some of his symptoms are from the liver disease.
    Oh your poor, beautiful Vic. Love to you Tersia.

    Like

  2. You have researched and know where you are going. Doesn’t make the trip easier, but you have time to prepare. Dear God love you for your patience and loving care for your daughter. I certainly hope you have family close by that can help you

    Like

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