What gives life will hasten death


Courtesy of: http://www.flickr.com/photos/violetteultracore/7442358584/lightbox/

 

I am so tired.  I think it is emotional more than physical.

Vic went to the movies with her friend Tracey today.  As she wanted to leave, Hospice arrived.  Sr Siza was VERY dubious whether she should go…  Anyway the boys went with to make sure she was okay.  They are so protective of her.

When Tracey dropped her at home she was so tired she could not lift her feet.  She immediately got into bed and I know it will take days for her to recover.  I am grateful that she enjoyed the movie.  I cannot believe my child went and saw The Twilight Saga Breaking Dawn Part 2!!  She is the most anti-vampire person I know!

She said “Oh Mommy, the one part was scary but it was so much fun!”

I have read up on the effects of continued morphine administration when someone is in Renal and Liver Failure.  We have no option but to continue the pain medication regime… It will help her live and yet it will certainly contribute even hasten her death.

I don’t care.  I want Vic to be as pain-free as possible.  It is becoming increasingly difficult to do so.  She is literally on a “morphine on demand” regime.  She cannot overdose – she is too used to Morphine.  The dosages have been titrated over many years…

It will be a difficult night.

 

 

“Being prepared to die is one of the greatest secrets of living.” George Lincoln Rockwell


 

26.6.2012 Before Hospice

Pain at the end of life is inescapably interwoven with, and often amplified by, multiple levels of emotional and spiritual angst as the inevitability of death looms. Fear, a potent pain magnifier, is the dominant emotion – fear of pain, fear of death, fear of the unknown…..

It is a fact that people at the end of life fear pain even more than they fear death. Sadly, for many dying patients, pain seems like the ultimate torment, and death is its cure. It does not have to be this way, and if you or a loved one is facing death, you have every right to ask that your final days not be consumed by pain.

It is estimated that a maximum of 5% of people who die from terminal illness in South Africa have access to adequate palliative care. Even in hospitals, treatment is far from ideal, because doctors and nurses have seldom had training in palliative care and have little idea of what to do with the patients.

Dying patients are often prey to a host of anxieties about the state of their affairs, about the fate of those who will grieve their loss, and about how their behaviour will be seen, and possibly judged, during their final hours. And of course, there are often deep spiritual and religious questions to address. Did my life have meaning? Will my soul survive my body? Am I at peace with myself, my family, and my friends?

Not least of all these concerns, people at the end of life worry about how their pain will be managed. Will they be under medicated and have to ask, or even beg for relief? Will they be over-medicated and lose consciousness during their precious waning days and hours?

They may even be afraid to complain. If they do, will they be seen as whiners or quitters? If they ask for narcotics, will they be judged by their doctors as drug seeking, drug addicts or even cowardly? Or will their medical care be relegated to comfort measures only, while all efforts to cure their illness are suspended?

I read the post of an amazing woman who is suffering from congenital heart failure.  She is in so much pain.  I cried when I read her post.  http://thedrsays.org/2012/11/08/  She replied to a question whether better pain control was possible…..  “there is nothing that will let me participate in life and have relief. so at this point i am going for being lucid over some so-so pain relief. who knows how long before i cave. when the time comes i plan to take advantage of whatever is available to me. just my personal choice right now.”

Vic has received a new lease on life.  Vic has 100% better quality of life since her pain is under control. We discovered, through the expertise of a wonderful palliative care team that Vic’s body did not absorb monstrous quantities of morphine! Now she is not only functioning, she is LIVING!  Vic is more lucid than she was before.

The pain was killing Vic… Palliative care has given her life.

Living life to the full!

 Being prepared to die is one of the greatest secrets of living.   George Lincoln Rockwell 

 

 

 

 

Is there pain after death – post 2


A pensive Vic…. 2011

Two days ago I reblogged a post “Is there pain after death” written by a Dr James Salwitz.  This post elicited some comments – mainly from Vic.  Vic has started reading the odd post of my blog.  In a way I am truly okay with it but on the other hand I find it difficult to blog my fears and emotions knowing that Vic may read the post.  I find that I have become guarded in what I am writing.  I am thinking that I should blog about stuff that may allay Vic’s fears….

Yesterday Vic asked  “Mommy, I know what we believe in but what if there is more pain after I died?”

“You read my blog?” I asked.

“Yes” Vic replied.

“Sweetie, I believe that when the time comes our loved ones will be our guardian angels and hold our hands whilst we cross over….”

“I know that Mommy but what if I am still in pain… What if the pain does not stop?”

“Sweetie, the pain that continues after death is the emotional pain that belong to the loved ones that are left behind.  That is what the post is about…..”

Tears welled up in Vic’s eyes and she said “I know that Mommy but what if I am still in pain… What if the pain does not stop?  What if your pain does not stop?”

Andrew, http://lymphomajourney.wordpress.com/, commented as follows… “Even before one leaves, I always thought it more difficult on my family to watch me go through what was pretty aggressive treatment than on me.” 

sbcallahan, http://thedrsays.org commented…”this is one of the difficult things about being the one who leaves. to know that your loved ones are going to suffer more than they already have is heartbreaking.”

“how to die? I have watched many die over the years and the range is as you would imagine. there were those that just could not let go and suffered every indignity to their body and soul. of course others went quietly with love around them. I have not decided if I want to be alone or with loved ones by my side. is there a way to make it easier for them? would they rather receive a phone call with the news or be at bedside? either way it will hurt them, not me of course as I am the one leaving. I would be lying if I said I don’t think of how I will miss so much. the thing is I have had so much, so much more than others and it seems selfish to complain. what they will go through is tremendous compared to what I will go through. I will sleep eternally and they will live. the best I can hope for them is peace of mind and future happiness. I want them to think of me and smile as I do now thinking of them.”  http://thedrsays.org/2011/03/

I am beginning to think it is easier to be the person leaving than the one being left. I have always known that about relationships and breaking up but now realize that it is the same when someone you love is dying. My husband became suddenly angry and I knew there was something wrong. it is so unlike him to get angry over nothing that I was completely off guard. we had been watching the movie “steel magnolia’s” and he asked me what Julia Roberts was dying from and I told him kidney failure. later when he was able to talk, he shared that it had reminded him of my own kidney failure and near death. we live in limbo waiting each week for blood tests to know if I am back in failure or good for a few more days. I don’t really think about it and when he shared his fear my heart ached. The sad thing is I have no fear and realize more and more how hard this is for him. I know that he will be fine in the end but it is hard for him to imagine he will be fine without me. It is so much harder to be the one being left behind. http://thedrsays.org/2011/03/25/the-one/

Vic so often tells me how worried she is about the family.  She worries about how the boys, her dad and I will cope.  Whether we will cope…. whether we will be able to get over her eventual passing….  Andrew and sbcallahan write about their fears… for their loved ones.  It is a fear that all terminally ill people appear to have.

My Mom died a bad death!  Two weeks after major surgery she died an agonizing death from septicemia   We could see the gangrene spread…. She was burning up with fever and no amount of pain medication could dull or relieve the pain.  God alone knows what went through her mind because she was ventilated.  When my Mom finally died we were so relieved.  We were relieved that her suffering was over.  We were traumatized by the dying process not her death.

As a family we have lived with Vic’s pain and her excruciatingly slow journey towards death for the past eleven years.  For eleven years we have heard her scream with pain, moan with discomfort, we hold her hair back when she is doubled up over a toilet bowel, vomiting until she fractures a vertebrae.  We have nursed open wounds, changed colostomy bags…. We have watched our daughter and mother suffer the most horrendous symptoms.

So baby, if you read this post, know that we will miss you.  We don’t want you to leave us behind but we want your suffering to end.  We will continue to love you until we are reunited one day.  You have to trust us that you will always be “my baby” and the boys’ mummy.  But know that we will be grateful when your little body is freed from its pain and suffering.  You will be at peace…  You will not suffer more pain after death.  We will mourn you but we will also be at peace…  We will think of you and smile…

It is okay to let go my angel child.

This is Vic’s Journey


I sense a loneliness of the heart in Vic.  I cannot imagine what it feels like to be aware of the fact that you are facing your last months of life, planning your funeral….No matter what we do or say – this is Vic’s journey.

via This is Vic’s Journey.

Hospice Day 11


 

Last night was an absolute night out of hell.

The subcutaneous syringe driver was halted as Vic’s tissue is so bad.  Vic is now on 100mg Durogesic patches and morphine syrup.  Initially it appeared to be an okay solution.  Then the nausea started…. The pain steadily increased to absolute intolerable levels by last night.

Yesterday morning Vic was great!  She obviously still has some of the intravenous morphine in her system.  (I also gave her extra morphine syrup as a precaution).  She went to breakfast with her friend Angela and had a wonderful time.  She glowed when she got back.  Gill, my BFF, popped in for a cup of tea and was amazed (once again) at how well Vic was looking.  Madam was even wearing a shoe with a little heel (which we made her take off).

In the afternoon Vic started looking grim.  She was nauseous and suffering from abdominal cramping.  Her tummy was distending.

By 10pm last night Vicky was sobbing with pain.  By 11pm she was vomiting uncontrollably.  She has severe intestinal pain and I believe she fractured a vertebra with the vomiting.

This morning I had an early meeting.  Half an hour into the meeting Vic phoned sobbing uncontrollably.  I was unable to hear what she was saying through her sobs.  I just said “Baby, I am on my way…”

When I arrived at home Sr Ciza from Hospice was here.  She had given Vic a morphine injection and an additional 25mg Durogesic patch.  Vic was already looking so much better.  Ciza encouraged me to get a night nurse to assist me… She had written a motivational letter to the medical aid without my knowledge.  I don’t think I am ready for that yet.

Whilst she was vomiting last night I thought of how quickly she “crashes” and how the good times have almost disappeared.  Yesterday morning Angela actually looked at me with a question mark in her eyes when Vic said she wanted to go out for breakfast.  I nodded my “consent”.  You see I had just read a comment from an incredible brave lady.

my husband has expressed the same concerns you have over your daughter pushing too hard when she does feel better. it is so important to me when i do have a good day to get out or make dinner, even doing laundry makes me happy. it is a reminder that i am still me. while i see your point and his, i know how vic feels and know that for me it is worth the price i pay afterward to have that time where i feel like the old me. the me before.  My heart goes out to you all and say a little prayer for your continued wisdom and love. http://thedrsays.org/” 

Today I would also like to quote my “mentor into the world of pain” Tracy Rydzy   http://ohwhatapain.wordpress.com/author/ohwhatapain

The concept of illness as a way of telling you to slow down is frustrating, as I have always lived life in the proverbial fast lane.  Since my first surgery, my life has basically come to a screeching halt.  Any living I do is now in the slow lane, sometimes I never even make it off the shoulder.  I think one of the most difficult aspects of pain, especially during a flare, is the comorbid (I have to use my expensive Master’s Degree vocabulary sometimes) depression and mood swings. 

It’s hard to deal with the slow down.  I mean, generally, this is something that comes with age and is a natural part of life, but when it happens at 33, how the heck do you reconcile that?  Before “all this” I felt so strong.  I felt like I could take on the world.  I used to be busy everyday, all day and the craziness of my schedule was like a high.  Now, I have maybe a quarter of that activity, some days, I have none.  The worst part about slowing down is that the pain slows down my body, but not my mind (thankfully), so in my head I still feel like the woman who can go all day, do it all, run around all day and still have energy left to cook dinner and clean the house.  Nowadays I get up at 1030am on a good day, workout and do maybe one chore, and by the time I am done I want to cry from pain and exhaustion.  But I am still me.  I refuse to let the pain change who I am.

I still feel like I can do it all, but I can’t. The constant drive to push and do more is, at times, a gift and a curse.  I still push  myself to do more, even if it comes with the cost of a day in bed.  When it comes to physical therapy (and the accompanying weight loss), I know that I push myself too far, too often.  That part of my brain that refuses to accept this “new normal” can’t give up certain things.  One thing I can do is physical therapy, so I will do it as hard as I can and push myself, regardless of the cost to my body.  A couple of weeks ago I hurt my back (more) while driving and the surgical nurse, who knows me well by this point, actually said, “I tell most patients to slow down for a little while, but I won’t bother telling you that, I know you won’t.”

Sometimes the slow down causes resentment.  I get angry that those around me have a life and are busy and that adds to the mood swings and depression.  The weekends are the hardest because I want to do so much more than I realistically can, yet I watch friends and family run from event to event with no need to stop and rest.  For me, a trip to Wal-mart requires a rest.

Flares do bring up an interesting realization, though.  Until things get as bad as they are right now, I didn’t realize that I was in less pain before.  So, in essence, flares tell your body to slow down and take it easy, but at the same time, for me at least, it takes something bad to make me realize that before this, I was feeling a little better, at least by comparison.  Now if only I could return to feeling like crap instead of complete crap…

So, the bottom line is, what do you do when life slows you down?  http://ohwhatapain.wordpress.com/2012/09/26/flares

I wish I had understood Vic’s pain-filled world earlier.  I am so sorry for getting angry with her for trying to live.  I wish we had more time.

Mommy, I thought I had more time….


Jared and his proud mommy

“You matter because of who you are. You matter to the last moment of your life, and we will do all we can , not only to help you die peacefully, but also to live until you die.”  –Dame Cicely Saunders

The Hospice doctor that called to see and evaluate Vic was a tall, slim young woman.  She has a gentle voice and long fingers with short nails.  She drives a Jeep and keeps large dogs.  She looks like a naturalist.

“I am Dr Sue Walters from Hospice.  The Pain Clinic asked us to see you.  Is it okay for me to examine you?” she asked Vic in her gentle voice.

Vic’s abdomen was severely distended and very tender.  She was running a fever and her resting heart rate of 103 indicating severe pain despite the fact that she had already taken her pain medication.  Vicky’s vitals were poor.

Sue administered a strong morphine injection.

“Vicky, you appear to have an abscess on the right-hand side of your abdomen.  The skin is hot to the touch and distended.  I think you have a partial obstruction.” Dr Sue said to Vic.

“I am here to see if Hospice can help you.  Do you realize that you are very ill my love?”  Dr Sue asked Vic.

“Hospice will not hasten your death my love.  It would be our aim and purpose to provide you with pain relief and quality of life.  We will treat you and not the disease.  It is exclusively your decision whether you want us to help you and how you want us to help you.”  She explained to Vic

Hospice is a philosophy of care. The hospice philosophy or viewpoint accepts death as the final stage of life. The goal of hospice is to help patients live their last days as alert and pain-free as possible. Hospice care tries to manage symptoms so that a person’s last days may be spent with dignity and quality, surrounded by their loved ones. Hospice affirms life and neither hastens nor postpones death. Hospice care treats the person rather than the disease; it focuses on quality rather than length of life. Hospice care is family-centered — it includes the patient and the family in making decisions. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/FindingandPayingforTreatment/ChoosingYourTreatmentTeam/HospiceCare/hospice-care-what-is-hospice-care

Vic was in so much pain that she was barely able to speak.  Tears welled up in her eyes and she softly said “Please doctor”.

“My love, you need to tell us how you want us to treat your symptoms such as obstructions?” Dr Sue asked

“I want no life extending treatment.  I am so tired doctor” Vic whispered.  “I can’t do this anymore…..”

“That’s fine my love.  We will try and relieve your pain and give you some quality of life.”

“Mommy I thought I had more time…” Vic said with tears silently running down her cheeks…… Then the injection kicked in and she drifted off to sleep.

Dr Sue said that the responsible sister would collect the morphine from the Hospice pharmacy and she would set up a  subcutaneous morphine syringe system by that afternoon.  Hospice would arrange for counseling for the boys.

She hugged me and left.  All of a sudden I felt so alone again!

Subcutaneous, or under-the-skin, injections use a needle to deliver medications into tissue just under the skin. An infusion of morphine, anti-nausea medication and Dormicum is now administered 24/7.

The first couple of days Vic slept a lot.  She was tired but there was immediate pain relief.

The nausea subsided and the partial obstruction cleared two days later!

The first infusion site was in her leg.  Within a day and a half the area “tissued”.   A common side effect associated with subcutaneous injections is injection-site reaction such as swelling, redness, and pain.  We phoned Hospice and the Nurse promptly came and the needle was reinserted into the arm.  Within two hours the needle came out again and the morphine was running onto the skin.  It was too late for the Hospice Nurse to return and to re-insert the needle so Vic went to the doctor and he relocated the needle into the abdominal area.

Last night the tissue in the abdominal area had tissued again.  It was also bloody and the morphine was running onto the skin and not into the tissue.  Vic was nauseous with pain.  I had no option but to remove the needle and re-inserting it into a different site.

“I think we should put it into the other side of your tummy” I said

“Mommy, I will insert the needle if you help me…” Vic replied

“No sweetie” I said.  “I will do it”

My heart was in my throat.  I removed the needle and cleaned the injection site.  I disinfected the new site that I had identified.  I took the needle in my hand and lifted the skin.  I pushed the needle against the skin.  I assumed that the needle would just slide in… It did not just slide in!  There was resistance!! I let go of the skin and changed my position.  I could hear and feel my heart pounding in my ears! I again took my child’s skin between my fingers and pulled it upward.

“Maybe I should relax my hold onto the skin…maybe the skin must more relaxed?…..” I thought.

I exerted pressure on the needle and it slid in…  Sweet success!!!!

“Oh Mommy you are such a star!  Thank you.  That did not hurt at all!” Vic gushed.

I do not believe her.  I had felt her little body tense up as the needle went in.  It hurt!

My entire body shook.  The bile rose in my throat and I slowly let out my breath.

We have all come such a far way.  Until last night I could not watch anyone stick a needle into my child.  Now I have stuck a needle into my child’s flesh.  I fear that Vicky’s tissue is too poor for us to continue on the subcutaneous route…… If we do I will have to do this many more times in my life.

The good news is that I was actually able to work the whole week.  It was the annual African Air and Defense Show and we exhibited.  Normally I would be absolutely frantic about Vic.  But I was okay with the fact that she is relatively pain free and the nursing sister visits every two days.

Vic is far more active.  She is truly so much better.  The partial obstruction appears to have cleared!  She spends time chatting to the boys.  On Saturday she took Jared shopping for a new shirt and shoes!

On Sunday morning Jared lit candles “For those we have loved and lost but will forever be in our memories♥..Gramps, Oupa Tienie, Ouma, Nan and Oupes♡”  Vic handed him his baptism candle that she received 15.5 years ago at his christening.  He lit his candle as he took responsibility for his own walk with God.  Vic and I laid hands on him and prayed for him.  It was so touching.

Joyous day!

Vic attended Jared’s confirmation service.  I have never seen a more radiant and proud mother in my entire life.

Vic has reached another milestone in her life.

The right to die


Did God intend for man or woman to “live” connected to machines to keep them breathing?  People accept the death of a six-year-old child by aerial bombardment or economic sanctions and defend the life of a six-week-old fetus. I personally live in a country where children still die from inadequate medical care and hunger.

via The right to die.